Teaching

My approach to shibari has evolved as the result of over a decade of practice on both sides of the ropes and a broad range of influences which I appropriate, mix and develop in my own practice. This has shaped my teaching style into one that seeks to reflect the experience of both tying partners on a deep level. I have a strong belief that shibari should not be prescriptive and encourage students to explore it as a flexible set of tools; adapting each tie to the body of the tied partner, and to their needs and desires within each individual situation. My teaching process aims to enable this by giving students a framework of the fundamental principles behind shibari; including safety efficiency and fluency, but also body awareness, communication, and conscious consideration of their own experiences and motivations.

It is important to me that my workshops are held in an environment that promotes inclusivity and mutual respect between all participants; I do my best to reflect this personally where possible, and ask also that workshop facilitators/organisers and attendees have an open-minded and aware attitude.

####BACKGROUND
I absorbed most of my technical rigging style a natural process of observation and experience from inside the ropes of the people I was tied by as a model. In this respect I have been lucky to have had a broad range of influences: Kazami Ranki, who I modeled for from 2011 to 2014 and whose style still forms the fundamental building blocks of my own style, and Miumi-U who studied with the Ichinawa-Kai, more recent influences include Pedro (whose own unique style was most heavily influenced by Kanna and Naka Akira) and Yukimura Haruki, whom I was very fortunate to meet in 2015.