Introduction To Shibari

Introduction to Shibari - Free Online Tutorial Series!

Hello! I’m happy to finally be able to share this Introduction to Shibari online tutorial series with you. The structure of this series is the end result of a workshop that I had the pleasure of teaching in London every month for over a year. During that time, feedback from attendees helped the content to evolve gradually into the form that you’ll see here.
The video series itself has been a long time in the making. Right from the beginning of teaching this workshop I designed it with the intention of allowing students to tie creatively from day 1 by presenting an overview of some of the fundamental elements of shibari together in a way that made sense within a larger context, rather than just as standalone elements. The response from students was really positive and it was wonderful to watch how fast they were able understand the principles of rope using this method, but I began to worry quite early on that giving this much background and context in the space of a single day could potentially result in ‘information overload’, and stop much of the information from fully sinking in.
The techniques used in shibari are something that need to be understood using muscle memory, and not just the brain, and that’s something that’s best done with frequent repetition. With this in mind, my initial idea was to create these videos with the intention of sharing them with workshop attendees for them work through at their own pace, and refer back to as often as they wished, but after some months of consideration I decided that it would be better still to make them public, and help make shibari available to a wider audience that perhaps aren’t in a position to attend workshops.
This series is in no way meant to replace real life teachers, rather it’s meant to give an initial foundation that you can ask a teacher for feedback on when you feel ready to do so, or alternatively, for having a handy reminder of something you might have forgotten. The videos are all intended to follow on from one another, but I’ve also tried to structure them so that it’s also possible to just dip in and out to find the relevant information. Each video in this series is broken down into sections, starting with an overview of the tie itself, followed by sections that give a bit more of an in depth analysis on various elements contained within it. In some cases this might be the technical reasons behind something, how to change your approach in different situations, choosing a good tension, and also the flow and handling with which you apply the rope which is something that I feel needs to be taught right from the very beginning in order to avoid learning in bad habits that you’ll have to unlearn at a later date, or some of the most common safety concerns within bondage and how to address them effectively with your partner. (expand on this once I’ve finished writing the rest of the content!) One thing that I think is useful to remember when studying shibari, is that there can be many different, and totally valid, ways to do the same thing. Which is not to say that there is no such thing as a ‘wrong’ way - just that different riggers have different styles, different priorities, different logics and reasons for choosing to do something in their particular way.
What I’m showing you in this series are all totally valid techniques, most of which I hardly ever use personally. I’ve deliberately chosen them because they form a good basis for explaining key principles and for helping you to start thinking like a shibari practitioner, and because they’re commonly recognised enough that if you go to take lessons with a teacher, there’s a reasonably good chance that they will be familiar with them too.

Course Content

Welcome to Introduction to Shibari
Lesson 1: Single Column Tie
Lesson 2: Joining Ropes
Lesson 3: First Frictions
Lesson 4: Double Columns and cinches
Lesson 5: Basic 2 Rope Gote
Lesson 6: A couple more elements, hojo cuffs and nodomes
Lesson 7: Creating other ties
Lesson 8: Tying with Flow, Presence and Connection